Gillian Ritcey’s “The Ethical Dilemmas of the Democratic Peace Theory in Relation to Copenhagen”

https://learn.saylor.org/mod/page/view.php?id=17435In conjunction with Copenhagen and the moral deliberations of Bohr and Heisenberg, how does an individual in a society determine what is legitimate, what is right and what is appropriate in war? As a means to tackle this question, I will explore how the political makeup of a society influences its citizens’ decisions in regards to determining what is just in war. The interest for this analysis developed from Robert Cox’s key question: “For whom and for what purpose has democratic peace theory been constructed?” For the purposes of this paper, how does democratic peace theory impact society’s concept of what is legitimate in warfare?

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Gillian Ritcey’s “The Ethical Dilemmas of the Democratic Peace Theory in Relation to Copenhagen”

https://learn.saylor.org/mod/page/view.php?id=17435In conjunction with Copenhagen and the moral deliberations of Bohr and Heisenberg, how does an individual in a society determine what is legitimate, what is right and what is appropriate in war? As a means to tackle this question, I will explore how the political makeup of a society influences its citizens’ decisions in regards to determining what is just in war. The interest for this analysis developed from Robert Cox’s key question: “For whom and for what purpose has democratic peace theory been constructed?” For the purposes of this paper, how does democratic peace theory impact society’s concept of what is legitimate in warfare?